Nikki Rose. 24. Personal Blog. | My photography blog is: nikkirosephoto.tumblr.com | My passion is photography, although I am currently a nursing student pursuing a degree. | I love art and science equally, and really, they are kind of one in the same. | I'm nerdy, and have an undying love for books of all kinds. | I struggle with depression and anxiety, so that will probably be an aspect here.


By the way: Serotonin is a neurotransmitter in the brain, that in unbalanced amounts causes depression and anxiety disorders.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from aplentee  1,483 notes

aplentee:

This week we have yet another giveaway for you to go with our Anniversary 42 T-Shirt Giveaway that is running throughout October.

This time you have multiple chances of winning one of these TMNT inspired ‘The Four Shadows' t-shirts by entering here on tumblr and over on Facebook.

To enter on tumblr all you have to do is:

Follow our Aplentee tumblr blog and reblog this post.

Each reblog of this post counts as an entry. 

You can reblog more than once, but please be sensible and don’t spam!

If you want MORE CHANCES TO WIN then we also have a competition for this tee running on Facebook - enter here.

No restriction on where you live - we will happily ship anywhere in the world.

These giveaways both end at 6pm GMT on Monday 20th October, at which point we will randomly draw the winners.

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In case you haven’t seen our earlier posts, we also have a MASSIVE ANNIVERSARY 42 T-SHIRT GIVEAWAY running through October on tumblr and Facebook. See the tumblr post about it here.

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Reblogged from mister-morton  162,380 notes
wombflowers:

flowerkittxn:

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

i never usually reblog things like this, but it’s really fucking important for people to be able to help

V important

wombflowers:

flowerkittxn:

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

i never usually reblog things like this, but it’s really fucking important for people to be able to help

V important

Reblogged from killerpancake  5,481 notes

geek-studio:

Here’s another Weekend Giveaway for you guys!

We’ve got some shirts donated by the awesome Aplentee plus some merch from the Geek Studio store!

There will be ONE winner! 

Prize:

The Rules:

  • You must be following Geek Studio and Aplentee.
  • Each reblog is an entry so you can reblog as many times as you want. Don’t spam though. That’s mean to your followers :) Likes count as well.
  • Likes count.
  • No giveaway only blogs!
  • Worldwide shipping so everyone can enter.
  • The giveaways end on September 9th, 2014 @ 2pm EST
  • Check the FAQ's before asking questions :)

If you’re worried you won’t win and want to grab the shirt now head on over to Aplentee and buy it! If you use the discount code GEEKSTUDIO at the checkout you can get £1/€1/$1 off your order! PLUS the popular PIKATRON shirt is on sale this week! So grab that one too while your there.

666grl:

psychoneurotical:

poorcelestialsoul:

itsallbeendonemorethenonce:

sweet-deer:

aunteeblazer:

groudon:

i like this but i don’t fully understand it…

whoa

you don’t understand how sad this is. each adult is a cross, and each child has been crucified by said cross. 

  • the priest (i assume he’s a priest, correct me if i’m wrong) killed the little boy in one way or another, probably rape, which is common among corrupted clergy men. 
  • the tourist comes to an overcrowded, poverty stricken country, taking up any and all resources that could have gone to the little native girl
  • the soldier comes to fight for his country, but ends up killing the innocent girl, probably in her village.
  • the little boy dies under the doctor’s knife
  • the man kills the little girl in a school shooting (represented with the uniform)
  • the “fat” kid is killed by obesity caused by a fast food epidemic in america, most commonly mcdonald’s, shown by ronald mcdonald himself. 

this is /haunting/ to look at. children can die at anyone’s hand. even the “heros”

Just to clarify that the little boy dying under the doctor’s knife is because the doctor is stealing his organs to sell in the black market, hence the cooler at their feet which alludes to keeping the organ alive and stable for selling. This is such a strong photo set, really induces a sense of disgust and sadness.

I cried a little

also, the little girl on the tourists back represents the huge child sex industry in south east Asia, popular among tourists